Bone Thugs-N-Harmony to release Sons of St. Clair Documentary

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February 9, 2018


Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s members Krayzie Bone and Bizzy Bone will be releasing a documentary called Sons of St. Clair via Silver Sail Entertainment. St. Clair is a neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio, where the five members – Krayzie Bone, Bizzy Bone (born in Columbus, Ohio), Layzie Bone, Wish Bone, and Flesh-N-Bone – were born and raised.

This documentary, directed by Tim Newfang, makes its debut at the Mammoth Film Festival which runs February 8 through February 11 in Mammoth Lakes, California. Sons of St. Clair plays on Saturday, February 10.

This documentary represents an offspring of Krayzie’s and Bizzy’s duet album entitled New Waves that Entertainment One Music (eOne) released on June 23, 2017. While recording New Waves, Bone’s long-time manager Steve Lobel stated that a documentary was in the works and would follow the album’s release, including major plans to push the album. Moreover, both Krayzie and Bizzy stated that a music video would be executed for each song. The news that were released by the members and their camp brought happiness to many fans. However, after the release of New Waves, everything changed.

For whatever reason, independent label eOne made the decision to give up on the album. The album, despite the favorable reviews online, that was expected to make some noise failed to make any clamoring bang. The album that was expected to chart respectfully debuted at 181 on the U.S. Billboard 200. The album that was expected to produce a music video for each song produced only five videos: “Coming Home” featuring Stephen Marley, May 8, 2017; “If Heaven Had a Cellphone” featuring Tank, June 9, 2017; “Fantasy” featuring Jesse Rankins, June 16, 2017; “Change the Story” featuring Uncle Murda, July 10, 2017; and “Bottle Service” featuring Jesse Rankins, July 17, 2017.

Everything that was planned for New Waves from the onset did not transpire and, essentially, after a month, the album died (despite the two pre-recorded music videos that were released). New Waves faded into obscurity due to the absent of monetary aid from eOne to promote the album efficiently, which prompted Bizzy to voice his anger – directed at eOne – on social media. Through Instagram Live, he made it clear that it would take at least $250,000 to promote the album properly.

Bizzy was also unhappy that Krayzie released another duet album with Young Noble entitled Thug Brothers 2 (June 16, 2017), one week prior to New Waves – a business decision that was purposely executed by Real Talk Entertainment to ride the wave of the highly-anticipated duet by Krayzie and Bizzy. (Krayzie had nothing to do with the release date.)

With the complete silence of New Waves due to eOne’s refusal to promote the project monetarily, many concluded that the documentary, Sons of St. Clair, was also dead. Fortunately, that is not the case, because it will be released via the Mammoth Film Festival. The documentary will showcase the recording process of New Waves and provide the history regarding Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s iconic music and the group’s genesis in Cleveland, Ohio.

A release date via DVD and/or Blu-ray has not been announced. The trailer can be seen HERE.

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Krayzie Bone Addresses New Albums, Lawsuits, and Plans for 2010

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January 8, 2010


Brady Allyn Media, in association with Dhark Knight Media, sat down with Krayzie Bone of multiplatinum-selling rap group Bone Thugs-N-Harmony for an interview in early January.

This piece will feature a brief recap of what Krayzie Bone stated and what he and his Bone brothers plan for 2010.

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s Upcoming Album

Fittingly, Krayzie starts the interview with the mention of the group’s new album, UNI-5: The World’s Enemy, which is slated to come out on March 2, 2010 via Warner Bros. Records and BTNH Worldwide.

Krayzie addresses Fixtape 3: Special Delivery, the songs on it, and the feedbacks from fans in comparison to UNI-5. At release, many fans were and are still disgusted by Fixtape 3 because it does not showcase that Bone flavor and energy that Bone often presents. Because of this, some fans stated that the new album will fail and will not be as good as prior Bone albums.

Krayzie makes it clear that Fixtape 3 has no influence on how the actual album will sound, for the group’s upcoming album sounds completely different – and a project that people will be listening to for years. With Bone’s track record of releasing amazing music throughout a 15-plus year music career, his statement is fitting.

To put more emphasis on how different the two projects are, he states that the songs on Fixtape 3 were purposefully allocated to an underground release, because the atmosphere in the recording studio collectively was not there, and thus the songs were neglected for their lack of excitement and did not make the final album cut.

(Fixtape 3 was released free online through BTNHboard.com after Christmas Day.)

Krayzie Bone’s solo album

He states his new solo album called Chasing The Devil will be out in 2010 and said “the album is gonna be sick.” The announcement of this new album is no surprise to Bone followers, for Krayzie has been working on it for about two years; in fact, the original release date was set for mid-December 2009; however, it was pushed back in response to the group’s album that was also set for a December 2009 release.

This will be Krayzie’s fourth studio album; he currently has eight albums under his name, counting official mixtapes and online albums.

Krayzie Bone’s Mixtape

Speaking of mixtapes, Krayzie surprised many by stating that he has another mixtape coming out entitled Fixtape 4: Lyrical Paraphernalia. His prior mixtapes, Fixtape 1: Smoke on This and Fixtape 2: Just One Mo Hit, were quite the catch and amazing; if this upcoming mixtape is executed in the same manner, it will be no different. This fixtape will be released before the release of his major album, Chasing the Devil.

Duet Album with a Bone Member

Fans for years have been salivating for a duet album with Krayzie and Bizzy. In fact, Krayzie, about two years ago, posted on BTNHBoard.com that he and Bizzy were planning on an album to fans’ delight – but no information came out since the revelation.

In this latest interview, Krayzie says he and Flesh-N-Bone are working on a duet album, but he has to keep it under wraps for now. Like his prior announcement regarding a duet album with Bizzy, this statement sounds great, but the actual execution – and release of duet album – is questionable, because Bone has a history of announcing future projects that are never released. Thus, this statement should be taken with skepticism.

Compilation Projects

Krayzie announces two compilations that are in the works: a Thugline compilation, featuring his Thugline artists; and a Cleveland compilation titled Cleveland Is the City, featuring several artists from Cleveland.

Lawsuits from Former Affiliates

In part two of this interview, Krayzie Bone addresses the lawsuits from former Mo Thug/Bone Thugs affiliates, but he speaks specifically on a multi-million-dollar lawsuit filed by Thug Queen – $22 million lawsuit to be exact for not being compensated for her recordings and songs. He says the lawsuit shocked him because he spoke to her and invited Thug Queen into his home months prior.

Moreover, he says that he, too, never got compensated by the record labels after releasing Mo Thugs 1: Family Scriptures and Mo Thugs 2: Family Reunion, both of which went platinum.

Wish Bone’s Solo Album?

According to Krayzie, Wish is working on his solo album and it will come out. This comment by Krayzie is nothing new to Bone fans, because every member has said the same thing in many interviews when asked about a Wish Bone album. “It’s coming soon” is usually the verbiage used, which goes back to the late 90s.

Even though Krayzie says it “will be a shocker,” he seems uncertain and his facial expression shows that. With a new year, fans should hope that the “it’s coming soon” verbiage is validated with some snippets and an actual release date. Honestly, based on prior talks and promises regarding a solo album from Wish, it most likely will never come out.

Wish is the only member in the group who has yet to release a solo album; Krayzie (being the most successful), Bizzy, Layzie, and Flesh have all released solo albums and account for more than 20 solo albums collectively.

Reaction to fans’ Thoughts on Bone’s New Music

The interview ends on a major topic that has kept the Bone forums very hot: the changing the Bone’s music. Many listeners and fans have said that Bone’s music has changed and is somewhat subdued and watered down. In other words, that hardcore sound from their early albums has dissipated. This is not debatable because it’s a fact that their music has changed throughout years, and Krayzie does not deny that.

Krayzie says that their music has changed, because they have grown up and have kids and families – and religion has played a part of it. He also makes it clear that their current music will not equate to the music they were putting out in the 90s because time has changed, and says a true artist must adapt with time. Thus, the lyrical content that was presented early in their career will not be revisited in the current times, because they are in a different place in life.

Krayzie actually makes some great points on this subject and makes sense regarding the group’s transition, for change is inevitable and Bone’s current music shows that. He ends the subject of conversation by stating the following:

“Anybody that, you know, get mad at us ‘cause we’re not rapping about the same thug stuff years ago … it may be time for you to find a new rap group.”

Overall, this interview by Krayzie is very informative and has a few entertaining moments. It’s by far one of the best interviews Krayzie has ever done.

This interview is about 25 minutes long and broken up into three parts (as shown below):

Part 1: Interview (9:01)
Part 2: Interview (5:27)
Part 3: Interview (9:09)

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Originally published January 8, 2010 via now-defunct Examiner.com

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony Plans Think Tank 4 in Los Angeles, CA – 11/27/09

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November 25, 2009


Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s manager Bobby Francis has scheduled yet another think tank for Friday, November 27, 2009, dubbing the event Think Tank 4. Like the prior think tank in October, it will be streamed live via BTNHBoard.com exclusively.

Strangely, it takes place after Thanksgiving Day, Black Friday (one of the busiest shopping days of the year)?

Information for this upcoming event has been kept under wraps; in fact, the location has not been disclosed. This is not out of the ordinary with Bone’s Brand Engine management team, because the prior think tanks were approached and executed in the same manner.

Those who were selected to attend prior events were given a meet-up location on the day of the event and, in turn, were told the exact location of where the think tank would be held.

Despite the lack of information from Bone’s management team, those who attend or watch the live stream can expect a similar show like Think Tank 3 – new songs will be played from Bone’s upcoming album and attendees will give their opinions on a paper that will be collected at the end. (Think Tank 3 was held in Burbank, California on Friday, October 23, 2009.)

In short, Think Tank 3 was a major success – even though it started more than four hours late and ran into the early-morning hours. All five members were present and performed their “See Me Shine” single with a live band; fans even paid homage to Bone by performing their songs. With success, however, came some form of problems by way of Bobby Francis.

This is why the announcement of another think tank caught many Bone fans by surprise, considering how angry and combative Bobby Francis was toward fans after Think Tank 3. Why? Because the 20-plus songs that were played online – via the live stream – were later uploaded onto YouTube for millions to hear.

Bobby, unsurprisingly, started attacking and threatening fans by claiming those who uploaded songs onto the Internet have jeopardized the release of Bone’s new album and will never be a part of what he and/or Bone is doing (if the songs were not removed). He continued his unruliness with the usual “haters” and his “they don’t wanna see me shine” verbiage.

From the beginning of these events, many people were intrigued and questioned the purpose of these gatherings and the beneficial value it would have for Bone, and it continues with Think Tank 4. Some think it’s a great way for Bone to interact with fans (and hear their opinions), while others claim it’s a waste of time. Both arguments make sense: The former is true because it does allow interaction, and the latter is true because it does not benefit Bone in any fashion (e.g., it does not provide promotion).

In truth, fans are the only ones who benefit from these events.

Bone’s new album UNI-5: The World’s Enemy is scheduled to be released by Warner Bros. Records on December 22, 2009 – and not one ounce of decent promotion has been rendered. Due to the lack of promotion, a couple of questions must be asked: Shouldn’t Bobby and his Brand Engine team put their energy somewhere that will be advantageous for Bone and their new album rather than executing another think tank? Shouldn’t more emphasis be placed on a broader audience rather than Bone fans who will naturally support and buy the album when it comes out?

These are basic questions that a manager should ask himself/herself when representing an artist, but it seems like Bobby and his team have no answer, or maybe their lack of experience precludes them from finding an answer regarding proper promotion and showcasing it with action. Thus, they organize marketing gimmicks and call it promotion.

Every artist should cater to their fans, but this catering by Bone via Brand Engine has gone too far and is senseless. How many think tanks need to be held by Brand Engine for someone in their circle to conclude that they are not providing any promotion? With one month left until the album is shipped to stores, more emphasis should be placed elsewhere to attract non-fans, for they are the ones that should be catered to and enticed to buy the album when it comes out – not long-standing fans.

More devastating to Bone is the fact that many people have no clue they have a new album coming out, because their “See Me Shine” single has not been consistently promoted on the radio nor with a video.

Record labels are usually the primary advertisers for their artists’ material, which begs the question on Warner Bros. Records’ role in regard to promotion. However, it does not mean that an artist’s management team should ignore promotion by holding events that serve no purpose for its artists – and that is precisely what Brand Engine is doing.

Nonetheless, if Think Tank 4 is anything like Think Tank 3, it will be a success and an enjoyable experience for the fans; however, it will not be a success for Bone because it will provide no promotion, nor will it attract non-fans.

For this reason, it would not be surprising if Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s new album, The World’s Enemy, is delayed and pushed back to 2010.

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Originally published November 25, 2009 via now-defunct Examiner.com

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony Plans Think Tank 3 in Los Angeles, CA – 10/23/09

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October 19, 2009


Orchestrated by Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s management team, the group will be holding a think tank Friday, October 23, 2009, in Los Angeles, California to promote their upcoming album called The World’s Enemy. This will be the third think tank thus far.

The first and second think tank, also held in California, had a sense of secrecy and exclusiveness, allowing only a selected few to participate. However, this think tank will be inclusive for everyone. According to Bone’s manager Bobby Francis, this will be the biggest think tank yet.

Because this event will be held in California, leaving many fans elsewhere unable to attend, the owner of BTNHBoard (Gibbs) in conjunction with Bone’s team decided it would be beneficial to stream the event online, and that is the plan for Think Tank 3 (allowing fans from afar to watch from their computers).

The live streaming of this event can be watched via BTNHBoard.com, Bone Thugs’ official forum.

Unlike the prior two think tanks, all five members will be present: Krayzie Bone, Layzie Bone, Bizzy Bone, Wish Bone, and Flesh-n-Bone.

Think tanks are usually occupied by a panel of experts in a specific field; however, this think tank will be occupied by fans and the media, most of whom have no expertise in the music industry or how it works. Therefore, it is safe to say that the attendees will not be the ultimate deciders of how the album is executed, but rather attendees that provide their feedback and/or advice on songs and other issues.

Bone has not used a think tank in fifteen years, so this is a new approach. Their albums in the past have been released without the help of the public’s opinions and garnered success. Their upcoming album will be no different, because fans will not be decision-makers. The final decision of how the album will be constructed and what songs make the final tracklist will come from Bone and Warner Bros. Records collectively.

Some people may still wonder and ask one simple question: Why is a multiplatinum-selling and Grammy Award-winning group holding a public think tank? According to Bone’s manager, these think tanks are held to give fans the opportunity to meet and interact with Bone members and to experience the “best fan-family experience.”

The exact details of what will happen at this event are not yet known. The location has not even been announced.

However, there are rumors that claim the album will be played in its entirety. This is very questionable. There is no doubt that some songs will be played, similar to the prior think tanks, to give the attendees a taste of what The World’s Enemy will sound like, but playing an entire album is unlikely and will most likely not happen.

Even though this event is dubbed Think Tank 3, and opened to the fans and the media, one should expect a press conference-like approach, where a question-and-answer session takes place regarding their upcoming album.

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Originally published Oct. 19, 2009 via now-defunct Examiner.com

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony Releases Street Singles Ahead of Forthcoming Album

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September 28, 2009


Multiplatinum-selling and Grammy Award-winning group Bone Thugs-N-Harmony is UNI-5, and on the verge of releasing their long-awaited and highly-anticipated album, UNI5: The World’s Enemy, on November 24, 2009.

After nearly a decade of working as a trio and quartet (due to Flesh-N-Bone’s incarceration and Bizzy Bone’s ouster), Bone Thugs-N-Harmony is once again a quintet. Bizzy returned early 2008 and Flesh, who spent more than eight years in prison, was released late 2008 to complete the fearsome five. He was welcomed home with hugs, kisses, and laughter by his family, friends, and Bone brothers: Krayzie Bone, Layzie Bone, Bizzy Bone, and Wish Bone.

With new brand manager Bobby Francis and his Brand Engine team, Bone wasted no time and made the recording studio their home, constantly recording and preparing to unleash their signature quick tongues and harmonic flows. Bone also put joy on the faces of fans by scheduling a few concert dates and fittingly dubbed it the UNI5 Tour (i.e., as in unified).

Pressured by fans to put out a new song or sample, the group released two full-length street singles late February 2009 via their MySpace page: “The Game Ain’t Ready” and “Nuff Respect.” (Both songs were initially singles but did not make the final cut.)

Before these two releases, members were hyped and said they would bring the heat – and “The Game Ain’t Ready” did just that.

The beat is bass-heavy, supported by hard-hitting drums, and each member brings it accordingly. The overall theme of the songs centers on how the music industry is not ready for the hot music they have forthcoming.

The catchy chorus, occupied by Layzie with background support from Bizzy, makes that clear: “The world ain’t ready / the game ain’t ready / these n….s ain’t ready / ‘cause the lyrics heated heavy.”

Bizzy, in his hyperactive voice, starts off the song with an introduction: “Yeah uh yeah, Layzie Bone, Krayzie Bone, Wish-n-Bone, Flesh-n-Bone, and that lil … you know it’s Bizzy Bone.”

That’s all Flesh needed to hear because he drops a blistering verse. If there were any worries of how he would sound and perform due to his long prison stint, some of those worries vanished and transformed into satisfaction, because he attacks the first verse viciously.

Layzie follows with a pristine delivery and with each word being articulated nicely. Krayzie, unsurprisingly, flows pleasantly with his smooth and quick vocals. Despite having the shortest verse (14 seconds), his verse is memorable. Wish, the most criticized member for years, does not disappoint and drops a respectable verse. Bizzy, although hard to understand with his new style at times, wildly ends the songs with a satisfactory verse. Overall, this song is nice.

The second street single, “Nuff Respect,” is not the typical Bone song that people are accustomed to hearing. The weak hook and bland beat are two features that keep this song from reaching the next level.

The rhythm may not be easy on the ears, but the members’ flow and intensity complement the beat well, showing that they can tackle any beat, despite its mediocrity. In actuality, one aspect of this song that makes it attractive is how each member delivers his verse, especially Krayzie.

He begins the song with a verbal onslaught that is quick, robust, and intense. He has a deadly flow and murders his verse from start to end. The way Krayzie swifts and manipulates his voice, switching up his cadence, to match the beat is unmatched by any.

Flesh attacks the second verse with a quick delivery of his own that’s somewhat whispery, but it does not affect his overall performance. Layzie continues the intensity with a clear delivery that is occupied with threatening lyrics if he and his Bone brothers are challenged and/or disrespected.

With Bizzy’s subdued and low-pitched vocals, the mood of the song changes; however, it does not disrupt the intensity of the song but rather brings another dimension to the song that is effective. Wish, who ends the song, drops a Wish-like verse with his signature repetition of words that gets him in trouble sometimes, but he pulls it off with his intense vocals.

If Bone’s vocals were extracted and placed on a different production, it would be a more enjoyable listen.

On August 25, Bone released “D.O.A.” (Death of Auto-Tune) remix; the original song appears on Jay-Z’s Blueprint 3 album. The sampled song has been praised by many and received great attention on many hip hop sites. However, like “Nuff Respect,” “D.O.A.” remix has a problematic beat; it is lifeless, annoying, and possibly one of the worst beats that Bone has ever rapped on.

The production was not meant for Bone but rather Jay-Z, so it’s understandable that Bone undertook such project for the sole purpose of promotion. The move was smart because it did garner attention and comparison to Jay-Z’s original.

Excluding the headache-prone beat, lyrically and stylistically, the members are on point and again show that they can deliver and flow on any beat (and sound good). For that reason alone, they get credit for putting life into a song/beat that was initially dead and dull.

There is also an inexpensive “D.O.A.” remix video, showing clips of the recording process.

On September 18, Bone released three more street singles via their MySpace page: “No Mas,” “Wanna Ride,” and “Let Ya Self Go.” These songs are okay and have some impressive moments, but they do not render anything special and are average at best. Moreover, the productions lack significantly.

In general, these five street singles and “D.O.A.” remix are not classics or flawless; not one (with the exception of maybe “The Game Ain’t Ready” ) has a long-term replay value and that unexplainable rawness that only Bone can offer via their unique styles.

However, Bone has made it clear that these songs should not be judged as an indicator of how The World’s Enemy will sound, for these tracks are simply street singles (i.e., throwaway tracks) that serve as teasers to get some buzz.

An artist’s painting should never be judged on the first few days but rather after the painting is completed and mounted – and that’s how Bone’s upcoming album should be treated: in its completed form and when it comes out. Like any other art form, music is an art; it takes time to build a project, select the proper production team, record the vocals properly, complete the mixing/mastering appropriately, strategize a proper promotional tactic, and select a radio-friendly single. These are crucial for an album’s success and are in no doubt being worked on by Bone and their team.

Bone has optimistically stated that they are working to create a classic album. Whether they can produce another classic album or not is debatable, but one thing is obvious: they can still produce a superb album with perhaps a couple of hit singles. The group’s track record speaks for itself, for majority of their albums have been certified gold, platinum, and multiplatinum by the RIAA.

Moreover, being in the music industry for 15 years and selling more than 30 million records in the U.S. and more than 50 million records worldwide is special (and not a fluke). Some artists do not last more than 2 years in the music industry, so for Bone to last 15 years in a cut-throat industry, and collectively drop more than 50 albums (greatest hits, group, solo, underground albums, etc.) is extraordinarily impressive.

The World’s Enemy will be Bone’s eight studio album; it is scheduled to come out on

November 24, 2009 under Warner Bros. Records and BTNH Worldwide, Bone’s independent label. (The album has already been pushed back four times, so the current date is questionable.)

The greatest predictor of the future is the past, which has been very successful for Bone, so their new album has the potential to be remarkable; that is, if each member executes his verses appropriately with quality production.

With so many filth polluting the airwaves and TV screens by today’s rappers, having Bone Thugs-N-Harmony back into the mix is good thing for the music industry.

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Originally published September 28, 2009 via now-defunct Examiner.com.

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony’s Reunion Press Conference, Moderator Debacle – 10/21/09

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October 22, 2009


Bone Thugs-N-Harmony held a press conference via Ustream on Wednesday afternoon in Los Angeles, California. The press conference was scheduled to start at 4:00 PM but started around 4:20 PM (7:20 Eastern Time).

While the group’s 1995 hit song “1st of Tha Month” played in the background, each member entered and took his seat. Flesh-n-Bone entered first, followed by Layzie Bone, Wish Bone, Krayzie Bone, and Bizzy Bone.

The press conference started off pretty well, because the questions were coming from the attendees present (i.e., the press). That all changed when the questions from fans started streaming in from online. This is when the press conference shifted and had an uncanny and amateurish ambiance.

The first strange question concerned horror movies: “Are you still inspired by horror movies since your first tape is Faces of Death?” (“What’s the last good scary movie you saw?”)

The question alone was off because it insinuates that they were already inspired by horror movies, which somehow precipitated the recording of that album. In fact, Faces of Death, a 1993 underground album, has absolutely no connection to horror movies, so why the question was asked by a fan, let alone selected by the moderator, was beyond strange.

The question of course received a giggle from Wish. Nonetheless, Flesh answered the question the best he could, stating that their upcoming album will not be influenced by horror movies. He also added he watches horror movies and at times has nightmares.

The second strange question by a fan concerned the Mayan Calendar which alleges the end of the world: “Does Bone have anything special planned for the Mayan apocalypse predicted on December 21, 2012?”

Again, Wish found the question funny and answered jokingly, “Yeah get you some can and soup.” Thereafter, Wish took a serious approach and answered with an intelligent response, followed by Flesh, who appropriately responded by saying that no one can predict the end of the world but God.

The third strange question concerned donuts; yes donuts: “Where do y’all go for donuts?”

By far, this question was horrible and received some laughs, not to mention some strange faces by the members. The members that responded, however, had the presence of mind to keep their responses short and moved on, for they knew the question was meaningless and only presented by a fan to generate laughter. Unfortunately, the moderator felt the need to present the question.

As the press conference continued, viewers were probably thinking, what’s next?

Considering the horrible questions that were asked by fans – and strangely selected by the moderator – it would not be surprising if questions pertaining to “what food do you guys eat for breakfast” or “what toothpaste do you guys use to brush your teeth” were asked.

That’s how ridiculous the questions were, including one being asked about a former Mo Thugs artist named Powder P, and another concerning the marriage of Layzie and his wife Felicia.

Aside from Bizzy’s constant spitting into his napkin, the members collectively acted professionally, answered each question intelligently and to the best of their abilities, including the nonsense and fatuous questions.

Thankfully, Bizzy saved the day when he stood up and said he had a duty to fulfill. The press conference was about 38 minutes long. Had it gone on even further, it would have been more embarrassing – thanks to the moderator.

For some strange reason, the pointless questions fascinated him. The only selected question that was important concerned the gravesite of Eric “Eazy-E” Wright, their mentor who died in 1995 after signing the group to his Ruthless Records. Other than that, the moderator did a horrible job with the selection of questions from fans. He was unprofessional and should have selected the rational and important questions instead of the silly questions, but he decided to go with the latter.

Many fans anticipated this press conference because they were under the impression that information would be presented concerning their upcoming album, but that was not the case. Questions about an official single, a video, or anything pertaining to future music were not presented.

In essence, the press conference began with fans not knowing much about the album and ended with fans not knowing much about the album. The only important information that came from this press conference was the release date of The World’s Enemy, December 15, 2009.

For what Bone Thugs-N-Harmony has done in the music industry for 15 years and counting, they deserved a press conference better than what they were given – and the group’s Brand Engine management team did not present a level of professionalism at all. Rather, an amateurish press conference was organized, which makes perfect sense why the members looked uninterested and uncomfortable at times.

Seeing the members side by side was an impressive sight, however. Each member handled himself well with the situation that he was put into, and did an amazing job with the questions that he was presented.

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Originally published October 22, 2009 via now-defunct Examiner.com

Flesh-N-Bone Released From Jail and Layzie Bone Denies Allegations

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March 31, 2010


Thirty-six-year-old Flesh-N-Bone, Stanley Howse, of Grammy Award-winning group Bone Thugs-N-Harmony went before a judge yesterday morning (March 30, 2010) and pleaded not guilty to 12-year-old allegations of striking his mother with a gun, which left a gash on her head. He later posted a $10,000 bail and released from jail.

Flesh was arrested Sunday night (March 28) by the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Office during a Bone concert in Cleveland, Ohio for two outstanding warrants – “Domestic Violence with a Firearm Specification” and “Felonious Assault with a Firearm Specification” – in January 1999 regarding an incident that occurred in October 1998.

Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s spokesman John O’Brien claims that his department received a tip that Flesh would be in town with his group, and thus converged on the House of Blues to make the arrest on stage, stopping the concert at mid-way.

Spokesman O’Brien also states that “he encouraged the people that were standing on the side of the stage, friends and family and that type of thing, to come on stage in front of him and attempted to dip down and move out through the side door….”

Contradicting its initial report, the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Office reported to the media that Flesh encouraged the fans to come on stage when he realized the plainclothes officers approaching to camouflage his escape.

First, he encouraged his family and friends to come on stage to plot his escape. Second, he encouraged his fans to come on stage to plot his escape. What’s next? He called on the spirit of David Copperfield from afar to plot his escape? The paradox is not only ridiculous but comical.

Some reports have even claimed that he was on the run for 12 years? These erroneous reports are embarrassing to journalism. Such false reporting could have easily been avoided with a diligent research which would reveal that Flesh was incarcerated in California’s Pleasant Valley State Prison from 2000 to 2008 for threatening a man with an AK-47.

Steven Howse (Layzie Bone), 35, the younger brother of Flesh, does not only deny the reports released by the media via the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Office, but he also denies all allegations that his brother pistol-whipped their mother during a phone interview with The Plain Dealer. (The entire article by John Soeder can be found HERE.)

As expected, Flesh had no knowledge of his outstanding warrants in Cleveland, Ohio. His family and his Bone brothers were also unaware of the warrants – and Layzie makes that clear: “If we knew about the warrants, we wouldn’t even have played Cleveland … I’m torn, man, because I love my city so much.”

(All of the Bone members – Flesh-N-Bone, Layzie Bone, Krayzie Bone and Wish Bone – were born and raised in Cleveland, Ohio – with the exception of Bizzy Bone who was born in Columbus, Ohio but raised in Cleveland.)

In regard to allegations that Flesh attempted to flee when he saw police officers approaching, Layzie states: “My brother walked off stage to get some water; he wasn’t tipped off… We cooperated with the police; they did their job and obeyed the law, as well as we did.”

He continues: “But why did the let us go on stage if we couldn’t finish the show? That was disrespectful. To say Flesh was trying to run – run where?”

In regard to the serious allegations that Flesh struck his mother Pamela Howse in 1998, Layzie strongly states:

“That’s a damn lie. My brother never struck my mother. I was right there. What happened was, some dudes were hating on us, and my mother got in the middle of it. She was trying to protect her children. And then they’re gonna say my brother hit my mother? C’mon, man. We aren’t barbaric.”

Layzie’s account of this 1998 incident sounds more believable than a report that was given/written by a police officer after the fact. Police officers are known for fabricating stories (e.g., Flesh trying to flee) and falsifying police reports, so it would not be far-fetched if the same historical practiced was executed in 1998.

Flesh, in the 1990s, was out of control and arrested several times; there is no denying his criminal history, which is why he was sentenced to a long-term prison sentence in 2000.

In fact, the recidivism rate is rather high regarding former inmates, but it would be suicide if Flesh engages in any criminal activities today to precipitate his return to prison. Moreover, it would be a financial suicide, considering he has possibilities to garner millions with his group via future album sales and touring. Any criminal activity that he gets himself into after spending 8 years behind bars would indicate stupidity and a lack of care for his freedom. However, despite being arrested in California (April 2009) for gun charges which were quickly dropped, Flesh has walked a straight line since his release in 2008.

Appropriately, there is a stigma that follows people who have done time in prison, but these outstanding warrants are from 1998 – not from 2009 or 2010.

Many have criticized not only Flesh-N-Bone with dehumanizing language, stating he’s an “animal” that ought to be in prison for life, but Bone Thugs-N-Harmony as a whole, claiming that group does not deserve to be touring in the U.S. and their music should not be played on the radio. The criticisms are premature, considering Layzie’s account that vehemently refutes these allegations. Thus, to characterize these outstanding warrants by the Cuyahoga County Sheriff’s Office as the truth, by some, only proves the phrase “innocent until proven guilty” means absolutely nothing.

In fact, in the public eye, allegations are usually treated as facts, which give people the license to verbally attack, demean, and view the accused as the bad guy that needs to be exiled from civilization.

Interestingly, Flesh and Layzie’s mother was present at the Cleveland concert Sunday night to witness her sons’ performance on stage. Sadly, after seeing her son handcuffed, she had to be hospitalized due to an anxiety attack – and Layzie was not pleased at all:

“She had just seen her son after all this time, and the [expletive] police – she didn’t understand what was going on. So I had to put my mother in the ambulance and my brother in the police car. You can just imagine how I feel.”

This was Flesh’s first appearance in his hometown of Cleveland in 12 years. Flesh, who resides in California, is currently living in Cleveland with family members, awaiting his pre-trial hearing on April 6, 2010.

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony has continued its 34-day U.S. tour without Flesh-N-Bone to promote the upcoming album UNI-5: The World’s Enemy, set to come out in May 2010 through Warner Bros. Records.

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Originally published March 31, 2010 via now-defunct Examiner.com